15 Posts

I was never a big fan of eggs until I started eating Paleo. But because of their affordability, and versatility, I eat them almost every day. Here are 10 of my favorite recipes:

1. Paleo Egg Muffins


2. Sweet Potatoes and Eggs 


3. Paleo Sausage Egg McMuffin


4. Baked egg and avocado


5. Baked eggs in ham cup


6. Asparagus, egg and bacon salad

asparagus egg and bacon salad-2

7. Baked eggs and chorizo


8. Baked eggs ratatouille

Screen Shot 2014-04-23 at 11.31.11 AM

9. Paleo banana and egg pancakes


10. Tomato, basil and prosciutto omelette








I used to live in Taiwan, and “tea eggs” were available 24/7 as a high protein snack on the go. For about 8 cents, you could walk into the nearest 7/11 and purchase one from a boiling pot of spiced tea. I got so accustomed to seeing them everywhere, that I actually missed them upon returning to Canada. Alas, here is the recipe I have been using the past year to satisfy my “tea egg” cravings:


  • 6 eggs
  • 3 1/2 cups cold water, or as needed
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 2 tablespoons wheat-free tamari (I used Bragg’s All purpose)
  • 1/2 cup brewed black tea
  • 2 star anise, broken into individual pieces
  • 1 cinnamon stick


Place the eggs in a saucepan with the water, making sure that there is at least 1/2-inch of water above the eggs. Cover and bring to a rolling boil. Remove the saucepan from the element and let the eggs stand in the hot water for 15 – 20 minutes, until they are cooked. Remove the eggs and run them under cold running water to cool. (Reserve the water in the pan).
Tap the hard-boiled eggs gently with the back of a spoon, to make a series of cracks all over the eggshells, while making sure the shell remains intact. (If the shell does come off, don’t worry – it just means that egg will have a darker color than the others).
Bring the water in the pan back to a boil. Add the salt, soy sauce, brewed black tea, star anise pieces, and the cinnamon stick. Add the eggs. Simmer, stirring occasionally, for 2 hours. Turn off the heat and let the eggs sit in the hot liquid until ready to serve.



It’s probably more delicious than the non-paleo stuff, and perfect for a guilt-free breakfast when topped with fresh nuts and berries, or alongside a paleo/gluten-free dessert. I even put the stuff in my coffee (a paleo approach to cafe con panna).

What to do:

Step 1: Take a “full fat” can of Organic Coconut Milk and place it in the fridge for some time or best over night.


Step 2: Make sure that you scoop out all the thickened coconut cream, and that the water is left over. Don’t discard the water, use it to drink or in a shake.


Step 3: After scooping it out, add a little cinnamon and vanilla, and whip it in a mixing bowl until it begins to thicken. Option to add a paleo sweetener such as Stevia, raw honey or maple syrup.


Step 4: Enjoy every bite, anyway you like!

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How to Make Kombucha Tea at Home

Makes about 1 gallon

What You Need


3 1/2 quarts water
1 cup organic sugar
8 bags black tea, white tea, green tea, or oolong tea (or 2 tablespoons loose tea)
2 cups starter tea from last batch of kombucha or store-bought (unpasteurized, neutral-flavored) kombucha
1 scoby per fermentation jar


Optional flavoring extras for bottling: 1 to 2 cups chopped fruit, 2 to 3 cups fruit juice, 1 to 2 tablespoons flavored tea (like hibiscus), 1/4 cup honey, 2 to 4 tablespoons fresh herbs or spices


Stock pot
1-gallon glass jar or two 2-quart glass jars
Bottles: Six 16-oz glass bottles with plastic lids, 6 swing-top bottles, or clean soda bottles


Note: Avoid prolonged contact between the kombucha and metal both during and after brewing. This can affect the flavor of your kombucha and weaken the scoby over time.

1. Make the Tea Base: Bring the water to a boil. Remove from heat and stir in the sugar to dissolve. Drop in the tea and allow it to steep until the water has cooled. Depending on the size of your pot, this will take a few hours. You can speed up the cooling process by placing the pot in an ice bath.

2. Add the Starter Tea: Once the tea is cool, remove the tea bags or strain out the loose tea. Stir in the starter tea. (The starter tea makes the liquid acidic, which prevents unfriendly bacteria from taking up residence in the first few days of fermentation.)


3. Transfer to Jars and Add the Scoby: Pour the mixture into a 1-gallon glass jar (or divide between two 2-quart jars, in which case you’ll need 2 scobys) and gently slide the scoby into the jar with clean hands. Cover the mouth of the jar with a few layers of cheesecloth or paper towels secured with a rubber band.

4. Ferment for 7 to 10 Days: Keep the jar at room temperature, out of direct sunlight, and where it won’t get jostled. Ferment for 7 to 10 days, checking the kombucha and the scoby periodically.

It’s not unusual for the scoby to float at the top, bottom, or even sideways. A new cream-colored layer of scoby should start forming on the surface of the kombucha within a few days. It usually attaches to the old scoby, but it’s ok if they separate. You may also see brown stringy bits floating beneath the scoby, sediment collecting at the bottom, and bubbles collecting around the scoby. This is all normal and signs of healthy fermentation.

After seven days, begin tasting the kombucha daily by pouring a little out of the jar and into a cup. When it reaches a balance of sweetness and tartness that is pleasant to you, the kombucha is ready to bottle.

5. Remove the Scoby: Before proceeding, prepare and cool another pot of strong tea for your next batch of kombucha, as outlined above. With clean hands, gently lift the scoby out of the kombucha and set it on a clean plate. As you do, check it over and remove the bottom layer if the scoby is getting very thick.


6. Bottle the Finished Kombucha: Measure out your starter tea from this batch of kombucha and set it aside for the next batch. Pour the fermented kombucha (straining, if desired) into bottles, along with any juice, herbs, or fruit you may want to use as flavoring. Leave about a half inch of head room in each bottle. (Alternatively, infuse the kombucha with flavorings for a day or two in another jar covered with cheesecloth, strain, and then bottle. This makes a cleaner kombucha without “stuff” in it.)

7. Carbonate and Refrigerate the Finished Kombucha: Store the bottled kombucha at room-temperature out of direct sunlight and allow 1 to 3 days for the kombucha to carbonate. Until you get a feel for how quickly your kombucha carbonates, it’s helpful to keep it in plastic bottles; the kombucha is carbonated when the bottles feel rock solid. Refrigerate to stop fermentation and carbonation, and then consume your kombucha within a month.

8. Make a Fresh Batch of Kombucha: Clean the jar being used for kombucha fermentation. Combine the starter tea from your last batch of kombucha with the fresh batch of sugary tea, and pour it into the fermentation jar. Slide the scoby on top, cover, and ferment for 7 to 10 days.

Additional Notes:

• Batch Size: To increase or decrease the amount of kombucha you make, maintain the basic ratio of 1 cup of sugar, 8 bags of tea, and 2 cups starter tea per gallon batch. One scoby will ferment any size batch, though larger batches may take longer.

• Putting Kombucha on Pause: If you’ll be away for 3 weeks or less, just make a fresh batch and leave it on your counter. It will likely be too vinegary to drink by the time you get back, but the scoby will be fine. For longer breaks, store the scoby in a fresh batch of the tea base with starter tea in the fridge. Change out the tea for a fresh batch every 4 to 6 weeks.

• Other Tea Options: Black tea tends to be the easiest and most reliable for the scoby to ferment into kombucha, but once your scoby is going strong, you can try branching out into other kinds. Green tea, white tea, oolong tea, or a even mix of these make especially good kombucha. Herbal teas are ok, but be sure to use at least a few bags of black tea in the mix to make sure the scoby is getting all the nutrients it needs. Avoid any teas that contain oils, like earl grey or flavored teas.

• Avoid Prolonged Contact with Metal: Using metal utensils is generally fine, but avoid fermenting or bottling the kombucha in anything that brings them into contact with metal. Metals, especially reactive metals like aluminum, can give the kombucha a metallic flavor and weaken the scoby over time.

Troubleshooting Kombucha

• It is normal for the scoby to float on the top, bottom, or sideways in the jar. It is also normal for brown strings to form below the scoby or to collect on the bottom. If your scoby develops a hole, bumps, dried patches, darker brown patches, or clear jelly-like patches, it is still fine to use. Usually these are all indicative of changes in the environment of your kitchen and not a problem with the scoby itself.

• Kombucha will start off with a neutral aroma and then smell progressively more vinegary as brewing progresses. If it starts to smell cheesy, rotten, or otherwise unpleasant, this is a sign that something has gone wrong. If you see no signs of mold on the scoby, discard the liquid and begin again with fresh tea. If you do see signs of mold, discard both the scoby and the liquid and begin again with new ingredients.

• A scoby will last a very long time, but it’s not indestructible. If the scoby becomes black, that is a sign that it has passed its lifespan. If it develops green or black mold, it is has become infected. In both of these cases, throw away the scoby and begin again.

• To prolong the life and maintain the health of your scoby, stick to the ratio of sugar, tea, starter tea, and water outlined in the recipe. You should also peel off the bottom (oldest) layer every few batches. This can be discarded, composted, used to start a new batch of kombucha, or given to a friend to start their own.

• If you’re ever in doubt about whether there is a problem with your scoby, just continue brewing batches but discard the kombucha they make. If there’s a problem, it will get worse over time and become very apparent. If it’s just a natural aspect of the scoby, then it will stay consistent from batch to batch and the kombucha is fine for drinking.

View original recipe here.



I finally went to Oz Cafe on Wednesday, with my amazing mother. I was impressed with their menu selection, especially the amount of local, farm-raised beef. Both of us ordered the Korean beef lettuce wraps, served with homemade Kimchi, hot sauce and carrot and cabbage “Korean coleslaw”.


The wraps were served with boston lettuce, rather than the traditional romaine or iceberg, and I found them to be many times better at holding the filling while adding a subtle sweet and buttery texture.


The beef was cooked medium rare and was absolutely succulent combined with the sweet and spicy kimchee.  I highly recommend a visit. I think I might go again tomorrow!



I went for brunch today at Maxwell’s Bistro on Elgin Street. They serve brunch seven days a week; until 11am Monday through Friday, which is great for late sleepers. I ordered the eggs Benedict with smoked salmon (they also offer ham and/or spinach). I kindly asked the server to remove the bun and to serve the dish with a side salad, rather than potatoes.  Restaurants are generally accommodating when you have special requests, and I found Maxwell’s to be particularly so! I will be back for more paleo and gluten-free goodness.





  • 1 bunch kale
  • 1 tsp olive oil
  • 1/4 tsp sea salt (optional)

Preheat oven to 350°F. Wash kale and remove tough stems. Cut kale into 2″-3″ sections and place on baking sheet. Drizzle with olive oil and sprinkle with sea salt, if desired. Toss kale to fully coat with oil. Bake for 10-15 minutes, or until kale is crispy. Serve hot.


Recipe courtesy of Paleo Plan
Photo top by Liz Mc
Photo bottom by Kasey Shuler





  • 1/3 to 1/2 cup honey
  • 1 1/2 cups steaming hot water
  • 1 cup fresh lemon juice
  • Ice cubes for serving
  • Mixed berries to garnish

In a heatproof 1-quart pitcher or bowl, combine the honey and hot water and stir until the honey is dissolved. Stir in the lemon juice. Let cool for at least 10 minutes or cover and refrigerate until ready to serve. Pour into ice-filled glasses.
Serves 2 to 4.

View on William Sonoma

Photo by Lion Heart Vintage




I went to Moonroom after work last night with a few friends. It’s one of the few places in Ottawa that has an upscale yet cozy and intimate feel.


I ordered a half litre of the Malbec … I really love red wine. My friends and I shared the bacon wrapped olives (an absolute must try), the spiced almonds, a few el diablo eggs, and a prosciutto pear lolly.


I was more than pleasantly surprised at all the paleo friendly snacks available. I will definitely be back!  In fact, this will probably become a regular hangout spot.



  • Fillet of Salmon
  • 1/4 sliced zucchini
  • 1/4 cup sweet onion diced
  • A handfull of cherry tomatos, cut in halves
  • 1 Organic sweet potato, washed and cubed (I keep the skin on for the added nutrients)
  • A handful of brussel sprouts, fresh or frozen
  • Half a lemon
  • 2 tbs Dijon mustard
  • 1 teaspoon dried Tarragon
  • 1/2 teaspoon Cayenne pepper
  • 1 tbs Extra Virgin Olive Oil
  • Salt and Pepper to taste


Roughly chop the sweet potato into chunks and coat lightly with olive oil, salt and pepper. Bake in the oven at 350F until soft and slightly caramelized; I added the brussel sprouts to the pan about 10 minutes after the sweet potatoes.


While the potatoes and brussel sprouts are roasting, chop the onion, tomatoes, and zucchini. Place the sliced veggies and salmon into a baking dish lined in foil.


Mix the lemon juice, mustard, tarragon, Cayenne, salt and pepper together and pour over the salmon. Cover the salmon with foil and bake until done, roughly 20-25 minutes.


To me, nothing beats the taste of roast sweet potatoes. Try and buy organic if you can because there is a big difference in taste, I’m talking water and wine! Loblaws now sells organic sweet potatoes for about 5$ a bag…worth every penny!